Early Humans Unit and Interactive Notebooks

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2016-09-02-14-54-06  Aloha Friends!  So I realize that many of you are here and reading because we home school, and since we’re doing more specific projects and units as Geekling gets older I’d like to share more of those. So I’m going to try hard to make Tuesdays about home school specific topics. Today I want to share a little with you about our Early Humans history unit. We’re working through history in a fairly linear fashion, beginning with the earliest humans discovered. I did purchase a a history unit from Intelligo to facilitate with this, but honestly with this unit I’m finding it more useful as a timeline builder and an occasional resource. What I am finding to be super helpful though is the huge amount of books available on the topic at our local library. We’ve mixed and matched things a bit and were able to find some good projects to keep our hands busy while we were learning. This was also the beginning of our foray into Interactive Notebooks. I’ve been seeing resources for these around, and decided we’d give the idea a try because it seemed like less busy work than lapbooking tends to be, but also gave us a place to store all of our information we gathered.

interactivenotebookearlyhumans

You can see Geekling hard at work here, graphing the height differences in early humans.  Pictured is a worksheet we modified to be the cover page for this section of his notebook (among many other sources I found this one), as well as his graph from the Intelligo unit study.

inearlyhumans2

In one of our books we found listings of foods that were common in the diets of early humans, so we made pictures and labels of those on index cards before putting into our book. Also a really great visual project was creating a timeline of the entire human history. We used several books to come up with a list together of all the things we wanted to include, decided on a scale, and used a roll paper to create and stretch our timeline from one end of the house to the other.

clayworkearlyhumans

Another fun activity was creating coil pots and necklace pieces from air dry clay. We made these, then painted them to be natural and common colors of these items. For our necklaces we created shells, bits of bone, stone beads, and Geekling even added a few nuts in.

For easy access, the books we used the most often were:

Make it Work: Stone Age People by Keith Branigan (this book was so fun we ran out of time for projects, in fact we still have one big project pending, keep an eye on the Facebook Page or Instagram for that)

DK Eyewitness Early Humans

and for fun fiction reading we tried out Lucy and Andy Neanderthal by Jeffrey Brown. Geekling really enjoyed his Jedi Academy books, and this new one did not disappoint.  All of the books mentioned here can be found in our Amazon Store under The Happy Home Library. Other supplies we love to use can also be found in our store.

I hope you enjoyed this little peek into our home school world. Have a wonderful week friends!

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